Instructions & Guidelines for Abstracts

Eligibility:

This competition is open to all students (Graduates, Post Graduates and Research Scholars). The abstract submission deadline will be closed (approximately) one month before the competition; hence all are requested to submit their abstracts well in advance.

The abstract should include complete details of the contestant (e.g., abstract title, author(s) name & affiliation, abstract etc). Abstracts have to be submitted online or by email. Shortlisted abstracts for the competition will be intimated through email and those will be displayed on the website as well.

This competition is open to all students (Graduates, Post Graduates and Research Scholars). The abstract submission deadline will be closed (approximately) one month before the competition; hence all are requested to submit their abstracts well in advance.

If the registered author/poster presenter is unable to attend the conference he/she may send a substitute who can be a co-author (or) any member from the same institution. If the substitute is adjudged as winner then he/she will be awarded the prize money, and the registered author/contestant will have no claim.

By submitting an abstract and poster, you certify that (1) the research, abstract and oral presentation/poster are your original work or original work conducted by you and other authors; and (2) all co-authors are appropriately credited for their contributions and have been informed of the submission. Violation of these requirements will result in disqualification.

Submission Categories:

  • Basic Science Research
  • Clinical Medicine (Research Study)
  • Case Report

Basic Science Research:

To improve human health, scientific discoveries must be translated into practical applications. These discoveries typically begin at the bench with basic research - in which scientists’ study disease at a molecular or cellular level.

Clinical Medicine (Research Study):

Patient-oriented investigations conducted with human subjects, for which an investigator directly interacts with human subjects. This area of research includes: mechanisms of human disease; therapeutic interventions; clinical trials; development of new technologies; analysis of existing datasets; epidemiologic and behavioral studies; public or community health, or social determinants of health.

Case Report:

Report one or more cases that illustrate a new disease entity, or a prominent or unusual clinical feature of an established disease. It may include a summary of pertinent patient history, physical findings, laboratory data, or management description

Note on Authorship:

In general, authors for research/case presentations are typically all persons who contributed to the intellectual content of the work. You must give credit where it is due (e.g. those generating data/graphs you use), and authors must all have an understanding of the work being presented; however, for case presentations, not every physician seeing a patient throughout the course of their treatment needs to be included as authors. The first author is assumed to be the presenting author, while the subsequent authors can be presented in a number of ways. In most fields of science, the last author is the principal or most senior investigator. Prior to application submission, the presenting author should contact all authors to determine if the order of authorship is important. Typically, the presenting author sends drafts of the abstract to all authors for input before it is submitted for the competition.

Note on Institutional Affiliations:

Institutional affiliations are generally the institution/training program/service/department where the author is supported (student or trainee) or employed (if practicing physician). It is up to each author/program how they wish to arrange their affiliations (since many training programs differ), and as such, each author must be contacted to obtain their affiliation preferences – again, this can be attained when the abstract draft is sent to all the authors.

Usually only one affiliation per author is required, though some authors participating in multiple institutions or programs may require two or more. For students, if research or a case was conducted at a particular hospital, that hospital is required to become an affiliation.

Filling Out the Abstract Submission Form:

Before you begin filling out the application, make sure you have the names, titles, and e-mail addresses of all authors. Draft your abstract in a Microsoft Word-compatible word processing program before you begin submission, so that you can cut and paste the abstract into the designated abstract form field. The Scientific Committee will use the abstract, limited to 250 words, as the initial screening tool.

Abstract Details

For Original/Research Article:

[IMRAD format (Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion) should be followed for Abstract construction].

Title and Author Information: The title should be in uppercase/bold letters. It is a summary of the abstract itself and should convince the reader that the topic is important, relevant, and innovative. Make the title short, descriptive, and interesting. Following the title, include the names of authors followed by their institutional affiliations. All the authors should have contributed significantly to the intellectual content of the research, and the first author will present the work if the abstract is accepted.

Introduction should present the background and the purpose of the research. The background information should include a statement summarizing the current knowledge in an area, what knowledge is missing, and how this research project addresses the knowledge gap [rationale & objective(s)]. A hypothesis can be included in the Introduction.

Methods should specifically address the following areas: study design (e.g. cross-sectional, case control and cohort etc. for Basic Research and randomized controlled trial etc. for Clinical Research), study setting (e.g. general community, primary care center, hospitalized care etc.), number of patients enrolled in the study, and how they were selected (inclusion & exclusion criteria). This section should also include a description of the interventions e.g. Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine (OMM) intervention, medications etc. (if appropriate), a description of the outcome variables and how they were measured, and the method of statistical analysis (include Institutional Review Board approval, where applicable).

Results should begin with a description of the subjects in the study and a description of those who were not included because they failed to meet the inclusion criteria or dropped out. Include the frequencies of the most important outcome variables. Consider comparisons of the outcome variables between various subgroups within the study (treated vs. untreated, young vs. old, male vs. female, and so forth). Numerical results should include standard deviations or 95% confidence limits and the level of statistical significance should be indicated.

Discussion should finally state concisely what can be concluded from the study and its implications. Make sure that the conclusions are supported by the data presented in the Results and do not present unsubstantiated personal opinion.

Conclusion should provide a brief summary of the study directly supported by the reported evidence. It should add to the body of knowledge and may include clinical applications and any recommendations for additional study.

For Case Report:

[Case reports generally have three components: Introduction, Case Description, and Discussion].

Title and Author Information: The title should be in uppercase/bold letters. It is a summary of the abstract itself and should convince the reader that the topic is important, relevant, and innovative. Make the title short, descriptive, and interesting. Following the title, include the names of authors followed by their institutional affiliations. All the authors should have contributed significantly to the intellectual content of the case report, and the first author will present the work if the abstract is accepted.

Introduction: A short Introduction typically describing the context of the case and explaining its relevance and importance. Describe whether the case is unique, or has an unusual diagnosis, prognosis, therapy etc. Is the case an unusual presentation of a common condition or an unusual complication of a disease or management? Describe the instructive or teaching points that add value to this case. Does it demonstrate a cost-effective approach to management or alternative diagnostic/treatment strategy? Does it increase awareness of a rare condition?

Case Description: When describing the case, follow the basic rules of medical communication by describing in sequence the history, physical examination, investigative studies, and patient's progress and outcome. Is the cause of the patient's illness clear-cut? What are other plausible explanations? Describe the treatments adequately. Have all available therapeutic options been considered? Are outcomes related to treatments?

Discussion: Discuss rationale for decisions that were made and the lesson from the case. Report a literature review of other similar cases. Describe how this case is different from those previously reported. Explain the rationale for reporting the case. What is unusual about the case? Does it challenge prevailing wisdom? In the future, could things be done differently in a similar case?